NH Secretary of State will turn over voter information to White House

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NH Secretary of State Bill Gardner.

CONCORD, NH – New Hampshire Secretary of State Bill Gardner will comply with President Trump’s request that New Hampshire turn over voter information to the White House.

However, the state is still figuring out how much information it will divulge, how it will share that information, and  whether to ask the commission to pay for the information, which is normally sold for thousands of dollars to interested parties.

On Friday, Secretary of State Bill Gardner, a member of the Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity, announced that he will comply with the request by Trump, to provide voter information in the President’s quest to prove widespread voter fraud.

What makes Gardner’s willingness  notable is that, according to NHPR, the same request was met with pushback from most states by officials from both parties. 

The Republican Secretary of State in Mississippi told the commission, in part, “They can go jump in the Gulf of Mexico.”

On May 11 the White House published an Executive Order outlining the establishment of a Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity. NH Secretary of State Bill Gardner 

As outlined in Section 3 of the Executive Order:

Mission.  The Commission shall, consistent with applicable law, study the registration and voting processes used in Federal elections.  The Commission shall be solely advisory and shall submit a report to the President that identifies the following:

(a)  those laws, rules, policies, activities, strategies, and practices that enhance the American people’s confidence in the integrity of the voting processes used in Federal elections;

(b)  those laws, rules, policies, activities, strategies, and practices that undermine the American people’s confidence in the integrity of the voting processes used in Federal elections; and

(c)  those vulnerabilities in voting systems and practices used for Federal elections that could lead to improper voter registrations and improper voting, including fraudulent voter registrations and fraudulent voting. 

Gardner explained that voting records are public documents. What was not clear as of Friday is whether Gardner would request payment for the information, as is usually required.

“What is public is what has been public for decades. In this state, every town and city clerk must keep every checklist they use in an election for at least five years so that any citizen can go in and look at the checklists,” Gardner told NHPR on Friday during an interview in his Concord office.

“Checklists have always included names, addresses and party affiliation, if there is a party affiliation. So that’s all that’s being asked of us,” Gardner said.

You can read the full story on NHPR here.

About Carol Robidoux 6307 Articles
Longtime NH journalist and publisher of ManchesterInkLink.com. Loves R&B, German beer, and the Queen City!