It’s a bird; it’s a plane; it’s the Aug. 10 Supermoon

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Supermoon!
Supermoon!

According to astronomers everywhere, a supermoon is scheduled to arrive Aug. 10, the second of three supermoons in 2014.

So what’s the big deal?

According to this explanation on earthsky.org, supermoon is not as exciting as it may sound. It simply describes a new or full moon that happens when the moon is closest to the Earth in its monthly orbit.  There was also a supermoon on July 12, and there will be another on September 9.

In earthly terms, a supermoon, because it’s closer to earth, will cause slightly higher tides. Astrologers believe the supermoon actually has an effect on human behavior as well, but that’s subjective.

You’ll have to let us know if you observe any unusual stupid human tricks.

Anyway, below you will find some supermoon facts from the U.S. Naval Observatory Astronomical Applications Department, so you can know exactly when the big bad supermoon will be rising in Manchester.

Note: You may consider a drive to the beach, where you can watch the supermoon rise with an unobstructed view, followed by a beach picnic and fried dough.

        Sunday   
10 August 2014        Eastern Daylight Time          
SUN
Begin civil twilight       5:15 a.m.                 
Sunrise                    5:46 a.m.                 
Sun transit               12:51 p.m.                 
Sunset                     7:55 p.m.                 
End civil twilight         8:26 p.m.                 
MOON
Moonrise                   6:55 p.m. on preceding day
Moon transit              12:13 a.m.                 
Moonset                    5:37 a.m.                 
Moonrise                   7:38 p.m.                 
Moonset                    6:53 a.m. on following day

Full Moon on August 10, 2014 at 2:10 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time.

About Carol Robidoux 5212 Articles
Journalist and editor of ManchesterInkLink.com, a hyperlocal news and information site for Manchester, NH.