Voters Guide 2019: Ward 9 Candidates

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Ward 9

Alderman

Daniel LeClerc, 57, is the Business Representative for the Carpenters Union in NH.

What qualifies you (experience, background) to hold this office?

I believe some of the things that help me qualify for this position are: I make sure my members are treated fairly and deal with any issues that come along, by listening and responding to everyone involved. When necessary, I consult others for input to make sure the proper resolution is reached. I work with developers and building contractors on upcoming and ongoing projects to make sure they go smoothly and supply manpower to fit their needs. I have also worked with NH politicians on legislation in our state.
List specific ways you will engage with your ward constituents, including one initiative to improve the quality of life for residents of your ward.
During my campaign I’ve been engaging some ward constituents by knocking on their doors and chatting with them. Although this may be my favorite way, it is not the most effective. My phone number and email will be available, and I will reply to all in a timely manner. One of the things I’ve spoken to residents about is the walking/riding trails. Much of it goes through Ward 9, with more to come, but people don’t always feel safe using them, and it’s not accessible year-round. One idea was to plow it for those people who walk no matter the weather. Another is to have the MPD make their presence known, by occasionally patrolling on foot or on bikes so people can feel safer walking or riding with their children.
Identify the biggest economic opportunities/challenges for the city and provide at least one initiative you would propose to improve economic development.
I think economic opportunities for our city are endless, and the recent meetings talking about the 10-Year Plan prove it. One of the biggest opportunities that Manchester has is bringing the commuter rail back into our city. Unfortunately, the greatest challenge for any growth, no matter where you go, is finding people to fill the jobs. In order to attract new residents and businesses, and also keep the ones already here, we need to have the best teachers and first responders available. Knowing their kids are in good hands and getting the best education possible while feeling safe in their neighborhoods, will make people want to move and stay here.
A large company is planning to move to Manchester, what would be your top three selling points?
The thing I would talk to a company interested in moving to Manchester is our 10-Year Plan. Let them know about the plan being set forth and that they, and other companies moving in, will help bring it to fruition. They can get in on the ground floor of a booming city that is in the process of improving infrastructure, creating housing, and developing the best police and fire departments the state has to offer, just to name a few.
What is the single-most important step we as a city can take to move the needle on homelessness?
To move the needle on homelessness, we need to learn from our mistakes. Manchester, NH, is not the only city and state dealing with this issue and it is far worse in other parts of the country. We can’t be afraid to ask for outside help and talk to whoever is effectively dealing with homelessness in their areas. Unfortunately what works in one part of the country may not work in another, but getting new ideas and making them relevant to Manchester is a good start.
Concord NH this year established an Energy and Environment Committee which has drafted a strategic plan to have Concord get all of its energy from renewable sources by 2050. Is this something you feel Manchester should consider? Why or why not?
I think having a plan in place to get energy from renewable sources and creating a deadline is a good thing, and perhaps Manchester should establish a committee to create one as well, but doing it city by city may not be the most effective way. If NH as a state hasn’t already established such a committee, then it should. That way if it becomes necessary to ask for funding, we can first ask at the Federal, then State, and lastly the municipal levels to decrease the burden on local taxpayers.

Barbara Shaw (incumbent),  77, earned an MA in Supervision and Administration, and is a retired teacher and administrator. She serves as a NH state representative.

What qualifies you to hold this office? 

19 years State Rep, 10 years Alderman, long history of community service.
List specific ways you will engage with your ward constituents, including one initiative to improve the quality of life for residents of your ward.
Online correspondence, personal contact, continue with work I have been doing and working toward safer traffic flow throughout the ward.
Identify the biggest economic opportunities/challenges for the city and provide at least one initiative you would propose to improve economic development.
Workforce housing, low income and senior housing. Encouraging landlords to work together with the city to provide this housing opportunity.
A large company is planning to move to Manchester, what would be your top three selling points?
Location, available workforce, very diverse community.
What is the single-most important step we as a city can take to move the needle on homelessness?
Accept and divert to a permanent solution through understanding.
Concord NH this year established an Energy and Environment Committee which has drafted a strategic plan to have Concord get all of its energy from renewable sources by 2050. Is this something you feel Manchester should consider? Why or why not?
It’s too radical. Smaller goals taking all aspects of major change one step at a time.

Board of School Committee

Arthur J. Beaudry (incumbent) did not respond to the questionnaire.


Candace Moulton, 36, is a registered nurse at Encompass Health in Concord.

Click here to see her website.

What qualifies you to hold this office? 

As a mother of two, I have a vested interest in the students doing well and see things from the perspective of a parent. I have teaching and tutoring experience in my work history, so I also see things from the perspective of the educators.
What will you do to get an agreement on a teachers’ contract?
Get all the facts, and work diligently to get a contract that works.
The state has sent $20.8M in one-time funding to the city. How would you propose spending that money?
Talk with the superintendent about what items are most needed. Books would be great, in my opinion, but the district will know what is most urgent. I would want to work with them.
A young family is considering a move to Manchester, what would be your top three selling points?
Our teachers and educators are dedicated to their work and love the students. We have students who get into colleges such as Harvard. We have a diverse set of course offerings at the high school level – many of which I didn’t have an opportunity to take when I was in high school. Our schools have a lot of positive selling points.
What is the most important step the Board of School Committee can take to immediately improve all schools?
Work together in collaboration with the parents and educators. Find common ground. Hear the parents’ concerns and find solutions that work.
How can MSD and the community work together to prepare today’s first-graders for a 2032 economy?
Focus on the basics: strong reading and math skills. These are foundational and are necessary in every work environment.